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Healthy Environments

Back in 2011 as part of the Wheatbelt NRM Community Small grants the York District High School helped to revegetate an area of Mt Brown in the York townsite.

Healthy Environments

In south west WA black cockatoos are an integral part of the landscape, harbingers of rain, tripping on half chewed nuts and drowning out occasional conversations with their raucous banter. But due to habitat loss, the Carnaby, Baudin and forest Red-tails are now endangered and need our help if future generations are to enjoy them too.

Healthy Environments

With fewer than 2,500 mature plants in the wild, the remaining Matchstick Banksia populations are severely fragmented and continuing to decline in size. the EPBC Act, but what exactly does that mean?

Healthy Environments

As part of the National Landcare Program Wheatbelt NRM has been set the task of urgently acting to protect the threatened species - Matchstick Banksia, Banksia cuneata, also known as the Quairading Banksia.

Healthy Environments

The iconic Carnaby’s cockatoo, Red-tailed phascogale, Numbat and Chuditch are all threatened species that call the critically endangered Eucalypt Woodlands of the Western Australian Wheatbelt (a Threatened Ecological Community) home.

Healthy Environments

Wheatbelt NRM has been contracted by the Australian Government through the National Landcare Program to conserve the iconic Eucalypt Woodlands of the Western Australian Wheatbelt.

Healthy Environments

This September and October Wheatbelt NRM set up a pop up stall in Bencubbin, Bruce Rock, Hyden, Kondinin, Northam and Wongan Hills. The aim was to provide wildlife attracting native plants to the local community for planting in their gardens. Moorine Rock Primary School also took up the challenge of planting 100 seedlings in the school grounds, as part of the school’s 100-year celebrations.

Healthy Environments

At first it looks as though the snake has haplessly wondered into a world of pain in this meat ant nest, but after observing for over 20 minutes it was obvious the snake was there for a purpose; to find a hole big enough to slither down for a meal of ant larvae.

Healthy Environments

The Matchstick Banksia – named because the flowers look like a bunch of matches is an endangered species which is only found on sandy soils in a very small area of the Wheatbelt Region. It is found nowhere else in the world.

Healthy Environments

This project involved revegetation around an existing woodland remnant.

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